Boyfriends and booty calls: sexual partnership patterns among Canadian Aboriginal young people.


Devries, KM; Free, CJ; (2011) Boyfriends and booty calls: sexual partnership patterns among Canadian Aboriginal young people. Canadian journal of public health = Revue canadienne de sante publique, 102 (1). pp. 13-7. ISSN 0008-4263

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Sexual partnership patterns, forced sex, and condom non-use can contribute to STI risk, but little is known about these patterns among Aboriginal young people despite elevated STI risk in this group. We describe sexual relationship and condom use patterns among Canadian Aboriginal young people, and how these patterns relate to the socio-structural context as experienced by young people.<br/> METHODS: We use data from in-depth individual interviews conducted in 2004 with 22 young people who reported ever having sex and who self-identified as Aboriginal in British Columbia, Canada. A thematic analysis is presented.<br/> RESULTS: Young people described a range of partnership patterns, including 'on-off' relationships which could have high rates of partner turnover but could sometimes be viewed as acceptable contexts for pregnancy, precluding condom use. Contextual elements beyond individual control appeared to contribute to these patterns. Migration between geographic locations was linked with risky partnership patterns, especially if it was linked with family instability or substance use problems.<br/> CONCLUSION: Sexual health interventions for this group must address partnership patterns in addition to promoting condom use. Survey research into 'migration' as a risk factor for STI transmission should consider reasons for migration. Interventions that address both individual level behaviour and the contextual elements that shape behaviour should be developed and tested.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Aboriginal, condom, STI, HIV, sexual partnership, ARRAY(0xdec1be8), ARRAY(0x116b105c), ARRAY(0x11c2c2b4)
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Global Health and Development
Research Centre: Gender Violence and Health Centre
Social and Mathematical Epidemiology (SaME)
PubMed ID: 21485961
Web of Science ID: 289223200003
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/924

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