Clinical trial: a multistrain probiotic preparation significantly reduces symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome in a double-blind placebo-controlled study


Williams, EA; Stimpson, J; Wang, D; Plummer, S; Garaiova, I; Barker, ME; Corfe, BM; (2009) Clinical trial: a multistrain probiotic preparation significantly reduces symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome in a double-blind placebo-controlled study. Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics, 29 (1). pp. 97-103. ISSN 0269-2813 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2008.03848.x

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Abstract

Background The efficacy of probiotics in alleviating the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) appears to be both strain-and dose-related. Aim To investigate the effect of LAB4, a multistrain probiotic preparation on symptoms of IBS. This probiotic preparation has not previously been assessed in IBS. Methods Fifty-two participants with IBS, as defined by the Rome II criteria, participated in this double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Participants were randomized to receive either a probiotic preparation comprising two strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus CUL60 (NCIMB 30157) and CUL21 (NCIMB 30156), Bifidobacterium lactis CUL34 (NCIMB 30172) and Bifidobacterium bifidum CUL20 (NCIMB 30153) at a total of 2.5 x 10(10) cfu/capsule or a placebo for 8 weeks. Participants reported their IBS symptoms using a questionnaire fortnightly during the intervention and at 2 weeks post-intervention. Results A significantly greater improvement in the Symptom Severity Score of IBS and in scores for quality of life, days with pain and satisfaction with bowel habit was observed over the 8-week intervention period in the volunteers receiving the probiotic preparation than in the placebo group. Conclusion LAB4 multistrain probiotic supplement may benefit subjects with IBS.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA, ANTIBIOTIC-THERAPY, LACTOBACILLUS, SUPPLEMENTATION, BIFIDOBACTERIUM, METAANALYSIS, DISORDERS, RESPONSES, PAIN
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Medical Statistics
Web of Science ID: 261781600011
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/6028

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