Neuropeptide S reinstates cocaine-seeking behavior and increases locomotor activity through corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 in mice


Pañeda, C; Huitron-Resendiz, S; Frago, LM; Chowen, JA; Picetti, R; de Lecea, L; Roberts, AJ; (2009) Neuropeptide S reinstates cocaine-seeking behavior and increases locomotor activity through corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 in mice. The Journal of neuroscience, 29 (13). pp. 4155-61. ISSN 0270-6474 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5256-08.2009

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

: Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a recently discovered neuropeptide that increases arousal and wakefulness while decreasing anxiety-like behavior. Here, we used a self-administration paradigm to demonstrate that intracerebroventricular infusion of NPS reinstates extinguished cocaine-seeking behavior in a dose-dependent manner in mice. The highest dose of NPS (0.45 nM) increased active lever pressing in the absence of cocaine to levels that were equivalent to those observed during self-administration. In addition, we examined the role of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF(1)) in this behavior as well as locomotor stimulation and anxiolysis. CRF(1) knock-out mice did not respond to either the locomotor stimulant or cocaine reinstatement effects of NPS, but still responded to its anxiolytic effect. The CRF(1) antagonist antalarmin also blocked the increase in active lever responding in the reinstatement model and the locomotor activating properties of NPS without affecting its anxiolytic actions. Our results suggest that NPS receptors may be an important target for drug abuse research and treatment and that CRF(1) mediates the cocaine-seeking and locomotor stimulant effects of NPS, but not its effects on anxiety-like behavior.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Analysis of Variance, Animals, Anxiety/drug therapy/physiopathology, Cocaine/*administration & dosage, Cocaine-Related Disorders/*drug therapy/genetics/physiopathology, Conditioning, Operant/drug effects/physiology, Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors/*administration & dosage, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Interactions, Extinction, Psychological/drug effects, Injections, Intraventricular, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Motor Activity/*drug effects/genetics/physiology, Neuropeptides/*administration & dosage, Pyrimidines/pharmacology, Pyrroles/pharmacology, Receptors, Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone/antagonists &, inhibitors/deficiency/*metabolism, Self Administration, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Anxiety, drug therapy, physiopathology, Cocaine, administration & dosage, Cocaine-Related Disorders, drug therapy, genetics, physiopathology, Conditioning, Operant, drug effects, physiology, Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors, administration & dosage, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Interactions, Extinction, Psychological, drug effects, Injections, Intraventricular, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Motor Activity, drug effects, genetics, physiology, Neuropeptides, administration & dosage, Pyrimidines, pharmacology, Pyrroles, pharmacology, Receptors, Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone, antagonists & inhibitors, deficiency, metabolism, Self Administration
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
PubMed ID: 19339610
Web of Science ID: 264767500019
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2681828

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
50Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item