Efficacy of amodiaquine for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Harper, Liberia


Checchi, F; Balkan, S; Vonhm, BT; Massaquoi, M; Biberson, P; Eldin de Pecoulas, P; Brasseur, P; Guthmann, JP; (2002) Efficacy of amodiaquine for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Harper, Liberia. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 96 (6). pp. 670-3. ISSN 0035-9203 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0035-9203(02)90348-2

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Abstract

In the face of spreading chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance, amodiaquine remains a cheap and efficacious alternative for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in many settings. In Harper, south-eastern Liberia, a previous study we conducted showed very high levels of resistance to both chloroquine and SP. In 2001, in an effort to look for possible alternatives, we measured in the same setting the efficacy of amodiaquine in a 28-d study in vivo, with results corrected by polymerase chain reaction genotyping to distinguish recrudescences from reinfections. In total, 107 children were included in the study and received a 3-d supervised course of 25 mg/kg amodiaquine. Of these, 81 were analysable at day 28. The overall failure rate was 19.8% (95% CI 11.7-30.1%) considering both parasitological and clinical outcomes. These results provide hitherto missing data on amodiaquine in Liberia, and confirm that the drug may still be efficacious in settings where chloroquine and SP are failing. We recommend the introduction of amodiaquine in association with artesunate as a first-line antimalarial in Harper.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Amodiaquine/*therapeutic use, Antimalarials/*therapeutic use, Child, Preschool, Drug Resistance, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Genotype, Humans, Infant, Liberia, Malaria, Falciparum/*drug therapy, Male, Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods, Treatment Outcome, Amodiaquine, therapeutic use, Antimalarials, therapeutic use, Child, Preschool, Drug Resistance, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Genotype, Humans, Infant, Liberia, Malaria, Falciparum, drug therapy, Male, Polymerase Chain Reaction, methods, Treatment Outcome
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: ECOHOST - The Centre for Health and Social Change
PubMed ID: 12625148
Web of Science ID: 181165200023
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/9102

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