Humoral responses to P. falciparum blood stage antigens (MSP3, MSP1-19, GLURP and AMA1) and their association with the incidence of clinical malaria in children living in a seasonal malaria transmission area of Burkina Faso (West Africa).


Nebie, I; Diarra, A; Ouedraogo, A; Soulama, I; Bougouma, EC; Tiono, AB; Konate, AT; Chilengi, R; Theisen, M; Dodoo, D; Remarque, E; Bosomprah, S; Milligan, P; Sirima, SB; (2007) Humoral responses to P. falciparum blood stage antigens (MSP3, MSP1-19, GLURP and AMA1) and their association with the incidence of clinical malaria in children living in a seasonal malaria transmission area of Burkina Faso (West Africa). Infection and immunity, 76 (2). pp. 759-66. ISSN 0019-9567 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/IAI.01147-07

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Abstract

There is longstanding evidence that immunoglobulin G (IgG) has a role in protection against clinical malaria, and human antibodies of the cytophilic subclasses are thought to be particularly critical in this respect. In this cohort study, 286 Burkinabè children 6 months to 15 years old were kept under malaria surveillance in order to assess the protective role of antibody responses against four antigens which are currently being evaluated as vaccine candidates: apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1), merozoite surface protein 1-19 (MSP1-19), MSP3, and glutamate-rich protein (GLURP). Total IgG, IgM, and IgG subclass responses were measured just before the malaria transmission season. The incidence of malaria was 2.4 episodes per child year of risk. After adjusting for the confounding effects of age, the level of total IgG to GLURP was strongly associated with reduced malaria incidence (incidence rate ratio associated with a doubling of total IgG, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.66 to 0.94; P = 0.009.); there was a borderline statistically significant association between the level of total IgG to MSP3 and malaria incidence and no evidence of an association for total IgG to AMA1 and to MSP1-19. Of the IgG subclass responses studied, only IgG3 and IgG4 against GLURP and IgG1 against AMA1 were associated with reduced risk of clinical malaria. There was no evidence of an interaction between responses to AMA1 and baseline parasitemia in their effects on malaria incidence. Currently included in malaria vaccine formulations for clinical trials in humans, these blood-stage antigens, AMA1 and GLURP, offer good prospects for malaria vaccine development.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Tropical Epidemiology Group
PubMed ID: 18070896
Web of Science ID: 252978600034
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/8374

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