Marital status, intergenerational co-residence and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality among middle-aged and older men and women during wartime in Beirut: gains and liabilities


Sibai, AM; Yount, KM; Fletcher, A; (2007) Marital status, intergenerational co-residence and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality among middle-aged and older men and women during wartime in Beirut: gains and liabilities. Social science & medicine (1982), 64 (1). pp. 64-76. ISSN 0277-9536 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2006.08.006

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Abstract

Studies from the West have shown an increased risk of mortality with various indicators of social isolation. In this study, we examine associations of marital status and intergenerational co-residence with mortality in Lebanon, a country that suffered wars and atrocities for almost 16 years. Using data from a retrospective 10-year follow-up study (1984-1994) among 1567 adults aged 50 years and older in Beirut, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality rates (per 1000 person-years) were computed for men and women separately. Age-adjusted Mantel-Haenszel rate ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated, and associations were examined using multivariate Poisson regression analysis. Most men (91.3%) were married at baseline, in contrast to only 55.4% of women. Compared to men, women were more likely to be living in one- and three-generation households and with a married child at baseline. While widowhood was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality among men only, being never married was associated with a higher CVD mortality risk among men and women. The presence of an adult married child was associated with a significantly higher mortality risk for men and women, even after adjusting for household socioeconomic indicators, marital status, lifestyle variables or pre-existing health-related conditions (hypertension, cholesterol, and diabetes) at baseline. The popular belief that co-residence with adult children reflects greater support networks and an avenue for old age security may not be a valid presumption in the Lebanese context during times of war.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, *Intergenerational Relations, Interviews as Topic, Lebanon/epidemiology, Male, Marital Status/*statistics & numerical data, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Residence Characteristics/*statistics & numerical data, Retrospective Studies, Sex Factors, Social Support, War, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cardiovascular Diseases, mortality, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Intergenerational Relations, Interviews as Topic, Lebanon, epidemiology, Male, Marital Status, statistics & numerical data, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Residence Characteristics, statistics & numerical data, Retrospective Studies, Sex Factors, Social Support, War
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
PubMed ID: 17030373
Web of Science ID: 242922600006
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/7318

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