Malaria chemoprophylaxis recommendations for immigrants to Europe, visiting relatives and friends - a Delphi method study.


Calleri, G; Behrens, RH; Schmid, ML; Gobbi, F; Grobusch, MP; Castelli, F; Gascon, J; Bisoffi, Z; Jelinek, T; Caramello, P; (2011) Malaria chemoprophylaxis recommendations for immigrants to Europe, visiting relatives and friends - a Delphi method study. Malar J, 10 (1). p. 137. ISSN 1475-2875 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-10-137

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Abstract

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Numbers of travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs) from Europe to malaria endemic countries are increasing and include long-term and second generation immigrants, who represent the major burden of malaria cases imported back into Europe. Most recommendations for malaria chemoprophylaxis lack a solid evidence base, and often fail to address the cultural, social and economic needs of VFRs. METHODS: European travel medicine experts, who are members of TropNetEurop, completed a sequential series of questionnaires according to the Delphi method. This technique aims at evaluating and developing a consensus through repeated iterations of questionnaires. The questionnaires in this study included questions about professional experience with VFRs, controversial issues in malaria prophylaxis, and 16 scenarios exploring indications for prescribing and choice of chemoprophylaxis. RESULTS: The experience of participants was rather diverse as was their selection of chemoprophylaxis regimen. A significant consensus was observed in only seven of 16 scenarios. The analysis revealed a wide variation in prescribing choices with preferences grouped by region of practice and increased prescribing seen in Northern Europe compared to Central Europe. CONCLUSIONS: Improving the evidence base on efficacy, adherence to chemoprophylaxis and risk of malaria and encouraging discussion among experts, using techniques such as the Delphi method, may reduce the variability in prescription in European travel clinics.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
PubMed ID: 21599909
Web of Science ID: 292196800002
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/688

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