Early immunological development and mortality from infectious disease in later life


Moore, SE; Collinson, AC; N'Gom, PT; Aspinall, R; Prentice, AM; (2006) Early immunological development and mortality from infectious disease in later life. The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 65 (3). pp. 311-318. ISSN 0029-6651 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1079/pns2006503

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Abstract

In rural Gambia the risk of mainly infection-related mortality is 10-fold higher for adults born in the nutritionally-debilitating 'hungry' season, suggesting that immune function may be compromised by events early in life. The current programme of research focuses on the biological mechanisms underlying this hypothesis, exploring early-life environmental influences on immune development and the long-term functional consequences these influences may have. Results obtained to date show that thymus development during infancy is critically sensitive to environmental exposures, with smaller thymuses observed in the hungry season. Measurement of the frequency of T-cell receptor excision circles indicate that thymus function is also sensitive to seasonal influences, with further studies implicating variations in breast-milk IL-7 as a possible mediator of these effects. Studies in adults have shown that size at birth is positively correlated with antibody responses to vaccination with polysaccharide antigens, thus providing evidence for long-term functional deficits. The present paper will review progress made to date within this field of research.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Gambia, immune function, programming, thymus, vaccine response, BREAST-FED INFANTS, THYMIC FUNCTION, BIRTH-WEIGHT, HUMAN-MILK, PRENATAL, UNDERNUTRITION, POSTNATAL ENVIRONMENTS, INTRAUTERINE GROWTH, GAMBIAN, WOMEN, FETAL GROWTH, RURAL GAMBIA, Adult, Birth Weight, immunology, physiology, Breast Feeding, Female, Gambia, epidemiology, Humans, Immune System, embryology, physiology, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Infection, epidemiology, mortality, Interleukin-7, analysis, Male, Maternal Nutrition Physiology, physiology, Milk, Human, immunology, Pregnancy, Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects, Seasons, Thymus Gland, immunology, physiology, Vaccines, immunology
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 16923314
Web of Science ID: 239971400010
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/6512

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