Effect of multiple micronutrient-fortified food on mild morbidity and clinical symptoms in Zambian infants: results from a randomised controlled trial.


Manno, D; Siame, J; Larke, N; Baisley, K; Kasonka, L; Filteau, S; (2011) Effect of multiple micronutrient-fortified food on mild morbidity and clinical symptoms in Zambian infants: results from a randomised controlled trial. European journal of clinical nutrition, 65 (10). pp. 1163-6. ISSN 0954-3007 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2011.103

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Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess the effects on mild morbidity of a richly micronutrient-fortified complementary/replacement food given to Zambian infants aged 6-18 months. Previous results (The Chilenje Infant Growth, Nutrition and Infection Study Team, 2010) showed an increase in the rate of hospital referral for pneumonia in the same cohort.<br/> SUBJECT/METHODS: A total of 743 six-month-old healthy Zambian infants were randomised to receive either a richly or a basal micronutrient-fortified porridge for 12 months. Mild morbidity was defined as an illness that did not cause death or require hospitalisation and was diagnosed on clinical examination at scheduled visits.<br/> RESULTS: There was no evidence of an effect of trial arm on overall mild morbidity during the study (odds ratio (OR)=1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.90, 1.20, P=0.62). Infants in the richly fortified arm had significantly more visits in which they were diagnosed with lower respiratory tract infections/pneumonia (OR=1.65, 95% CI=1.06, 2.59, P=0.03) and fewer visits in which a diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made (OR=0.43, 95% CI=0.21, 0.87, P=0.02). Maternally reported symptoms were similar between trial arms.<br/> CONCLUSION: Compared with the basal diet, the richly micronutrient-fortified food was associated with more episodes of lower respiratory infections/pneumonia diagnosed at scheduled visits, which reinforces our previously reported findings of a higher incidence in hospital referral for pneumonia.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Research Centre: Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
Tropical Epidemiology Group
PubMed ID: 21654700
Web of Science ID: 295807400012
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/637

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