Population-level effect of potential HSV2 prophylactic vaccines on HIV incidence in sub-Saharan Africa.


Freeman, EE; White, RG; Bakker, R; Orroth, KK; Weiss, HA; Buvé, A; Hayes, RJ; Glynn, JR; (2009) Population-level effect of potential HSV2 prophylactic vaccines on HIV incidence in sub-Saharan Africa. Vaccine, 27 (6). pp. 940-6. ISSN 0264-410X DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2008.11.074

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Abstract

Herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV2) infection increases HIV transmission. We explore the impact of a potential prophylactic HSV2 vaccination on HIV incidence in Africa using STDSIM an individual-based model. A campaign that achieved 70% coverage over 5 years with a vaccine that reduced susceptibility to HSV2 acquisition and HSV2 reactivation by 75% for 10 years, reduced HIV incidence by 30-40% after 20 years (range 4-66%). Over 20 years, in most scenarios fewer than 100 vaccinations were required to avert one HIV infection. HSV2 vaccines could have a substantial impact on HIV incidence. Intensified efforts are needed to develop an effective HSV2 vaccine.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Population Studies (1974-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
Tropical Epidemiology Group
Vaccine Centre
Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
PubMed ID: 19071187
Web of Science ID: 263421800018
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/5925

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