Is There a Statistical Relationship between Economic Crises and Changes in Government Health Expenditure Growth? An Analysis of Twenty-Four European Countries.


Cylus, J; Mladovsky, P; McKee, M; (2012) Is There a Statistical Relationship between Economic Crises and Changes in Government Health Expenditure Growth? An Analysis of Twenty-Four European Countries. Health services research, 47 (6). pp. 2204-24. ISSN 0017-9124 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-6773.2012.01428.x

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To identify whether, by what means, and the extent to which historically, government health care expenditure growth in Europe has changed following economic crises.<br/> DATA SOURCES: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Health Data 2011.<br/> STUDY DESIGN: Cross-country fixed effects multiple regression analysis is used to determine whether statutory health care expenditure growth in the year after economic crises differs from that which would otherwise be predicted by general economic trends. Better understanding of the mechanisms involved is achieved by distinguishing between policy responses which lead to cost-shifting and all others.<br/> FINDINGS: In the year after an economic downturn, public health care expenditure grows more slowly than would have been expected given the longer term economic climate. Cost-shifting and other policy responses are both associated with these slowdowns. However, while changes in tax-derived expenditure are associated with both cost-shifting and other policy responses following a crisis, changes in expenditure derived from social insurance have been associated only with changes in cost-shifting.<br/> CONCLUSIONS: Disproportionate cuts to the health sector, as well as reliance on cost-shifting to slow growth in health care expenditure, serve as a warning in terms of potentially negative effects on equity, efficiency, and quality of health services and, potentially, health outcomes following economic crises.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Health Services Research and Policy
Research Centre: ECOHOST - The Centre for Health and Social Change
Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 22670771
Web of Science ID: 310983100008
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/57714

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
304Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item