Antiretroviral Therapy in the Malawi Police Force: Access to Therapy and Treatment Outcomes


Makombe, SD; Jahn, A; Tweya, H; Chuka, S; Yu, JK; Hedt, B; Weigel, R; Nkhata, A; Schouten, EJ; Kamoto, K; Harries, AD; (2008) Antiretroviral Therapy in the Malawi Police Force: Access to Therapy and Treatment Outcomes. Malawi Medical Journal, 20 (1). pp. 23-7. ISSN 1995-7262

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
License:

Download (297kB) | Preview

Abstract

: A national survey was carried out in all the 103 public sector and 38 private sector facilities in Malawi providing antiretroviral therapy (ART) to determine uptake of ART and subsequent treatment outcomes in police force personnel. All patients registered for ART and their subsequent treatment outcomes were censored on December 31st 2006. There were 85168 patients started on ART in both public and private sectors, of whom 463 (0.6%) were police force personnel. Of police force personnel starting ART, 17% were in WHO clinical stage 1 or 2 with a CD4-lymphocyte count of &lt; or = 250 cells/microL and 83% were in stage 3 or 4. Treatment outcomes of police force personnel by the end of December 2006 were 302 (65%) alive and on ART at their registration facility, 59 (13%) dead, 30 (7%) lost to follow-up, 1 stopped treatment and 71 (15%) transferred to another facility. Their probability of being alive on ART at 6-, 12- and 18-months was 83.2%, 78.6% and 76.7% respectively. There has been a good access of police force personnel to ART since national scale up commenced with good treatment outcomes, and this should serve as an example for other police forces in the region.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Adult, Aged, Anti-HIV Agents, administration & dosage, therapeutic use, Data Collection, Female, HIV Infections, drug therapy, epidemiology, Health Services Accessibility, Hospitals, Private, Hospitals, Public, Humans, Malawi, epidemiology, Male, Middle Aged, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Police, statistics & numerical data
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
PubMed ID: 19260443
Web of Science ID: 263497100007
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/5583

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
22Downloads
302Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item