Trials and tribulations: cross-learning from the practices of epidemiologists and economists in the evaluation of public health interventions.


Powell-Jackson, T; Davey, C; Masset, E; Krishnaratne, S; Hayes, R; Hanson, K; Hargreaves, JR; (2018) Trials and tribulations: cross-learning from the practices of epidemiologists and economists in the evaluation of public health interventions. Health policy and planning. ISSN 0268-1080 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/heapol/czy028

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Abstract

The randomized controlled trial is commonly used by both epidemiologists and economists to test the effectiveness of public health interventions. Yet we have noticed differences in practice between the two disciplines. In this article, we propose that there are some underlying differences between the disciplines in the way trials are used, how they are conducted and how results from trials are reported and disseminated. We hypothesize that evidence-based public health could be strengthened by understanding these differences, harvesting best-practice across the disciplines and breaking down communication barriers between economists and epidemiologists who conduct trials of public health interventions.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Global Health and Development
Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Social and Environmental Health Research
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Research Centre: Antimicrobial Resistance Centre (AMR)
PubMed ID: 29596614
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4647221

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