Comparative Heterochromatin Profiling Reveals Conserved and Unique Epigenome Signatures Linked to Adaptation and Development of Malaria Parasites.


Fraschka, SA; Filarsky, M; Hoo, R; Niederwieser, I; Yam, XY; Brancucci, NMB; Mohring, F; Mushunje, AT; Huang, X; Christensen, PR; Nosten, F; Bozdech, Z; Russell, B; Moon, RW; Marti, M; Preiser, PR; Bártfai, R; Voss, TS; (2018) Comparative Heterochromatin Profiling Reveals Conserved and Unique Epigenome Signatures Linked to Adaptation and Development of Malaria Parasites. Cell host & microbe. ISSN 1931-3128 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chom.2018.01.008

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
License:

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

Heterochromatin-dependent gene silencing is central to the adaptation and survival of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites, allowing clonally variant gene expression during blood infection in humans. By assessing genome-wide heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) occupancy, we present a comprehensive analysis of heterochromatin landscapes across different Plasmodium species, strains, and life cycle stages. Common targets of epigenetic silencing include fast-evolving multi-gene families encoding surface antigens and a small set of conserved HP1-associated genes with regulatory potential. Many P. falciparum heterochromatic genes are marked in a strain-specific manner, increasing the parasite's adaptive capacity. Whereas heterochromatin is strictly maintained during mitotic proliferation of asexual blood stage parasites, substantial heterochromatin reorganization occurs in differentiating gametocytes and appears crucial for the activation of key gametocyte-specific genes and adaptation of erythrocyte remodeling machinery. Collectively, these findings provide a catalog of heterochromatic genes and reveal conserved and specialized features of epigenetic control across the genus Plasmodium.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Immunology and Infection
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
Related URLs:
PubMed ID: 29503181
Web of Science ID: 427477400015
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4646939

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
8Downloads
17Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item