Role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10 by the PPD antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.


Jung, SB; Song, CH; Yang, CS; Kim, SY; Lee, KS; Shin, AR; Lee, JS; Nam, HS; Kim, HJ; Park, JK; Paik, TH; Jo, EK; (2005) Role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10 by the PPD antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Journal of clinical immunology, 25 (5). pp. 482-90. ISSN 0271-9142 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10875-005-5431-1

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Abstract

Here we investigated the role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in the secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-10 in human primary monocytes after stimulation with the PPD antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. MAPK [extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and p38] and Akt are rapidly phosphorylated in human monocytes stimulated with PPD. We found that the PI 3-K-Akt pathway stimulated by PPD is essential for both IL-10 and TNF-alpha production, although the inhibition of IL-10 production was more pronounced. The analysis of cytokine production using specific inhibitors of the MAPK pathway revealed that both p38 and ERK activation are essential for PPD-induced TNF-alpha production, whereas p38, but not ERK, activation is essential for IL-10 secretion. The inhibition of PI 3-K did not significantly activate p38 MAPK or ERK 1/2 in PPD-stimulated human monocytes. Further, the Src inhibitor PP2 inhibited the release of TNF-alpha but enhanced IL-10 release, suggesting the differential regulation of Src kinase in upstream signaling. Collectively, these data suggest that the PI 3-K and MAPK pathways play a central role in the regulation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines by the PPD antigen of M. tuberculosis.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Immunology and Infection
PubMed ID: 16160917
Web of Science ID: 231882800009
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4593

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