Effects of seasonal and pandemic influenza on health-related quality of life, work and school absence in England: results from the Flu Watch cohort study.


Fragaszy, EB; Warren-Gash, C; White, PJ; Zambon, M; Edmunds, WJ; Nguyen-Van-Tam, JS; Hayward, AC; Flu Watch Group, ; (2017) Effects of seasonal and pandemic influenza on health-related quality of life, work and school absence in England: results from the Flu Watch cohort study. Influenza and other respiratory viruses. ISSN 1750-2640 DOI: 10.1111/irv.12506

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Abstract

Estimates of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and work/school absences for influenza are typically based on medically-attended cases or those meeting influenza-like-illness (ILI) case definitions, and thus biased towards severe disease. Although community influenza cases are more common, estimates of their effects on HRQoL and absences are limited. To measure Quality-Adjusted Life Days and Years (QALDs and QALYs) lost and work/school absences among community cases of acute respiratory infections (ARI), ILI and influenza A and B and to estimate community burden of QALY loss and absences from influenza. Flu Watch was a community cohort in England from 2006-2011. Participants were followed-up weekly. During respiratory illness they prospectively recorded daily symptoms, work/school absences and EQ-5D-3L data and submitted nasal swabs for RT-PCR influenza testing. Average QALD lost was 0.26, 0.93, 1.61 and 1.84 for ARI, ILI, H1N1pdm09 and influenza B cases respectively. 40% of influenza A cases and 24% of influenza B cases took time off work/school with an average duration of 3.6 days and 2.4 days respectively. In England, community influenza cases lost 24,300 QALYs in 2010/11 and had an estimated 2.9 million absences per season based on data from 2006/07 - 2009/10. Our QALDs and QALYs lost and work and school absence estimates are lower than previous estimates because we focus on community cases, most of which are mild, may not meet ILI definitions and do not result in healthcare consultations. Nevertheless, they contribute a substantial loss of HRQoL on a population level. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: EHR Research Group
PubMed ID: 28991409
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4503972

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