Concentration-Response Function for Ozone and Daily Mortality: Results from Five Urban and Five Rural UK Populations


Atkinson, RW; Yu, DH; Armstrong, BG; Pattenden, S; Wilkinson, P; Doherty, RM; Heal, MR; Anderson, HR; (2012) Concentration-Response Function for Ozone and Daily Mortality: Results from Five Urban and Five Rural UK Populations. Environmental health perspectives, 120 (10). pp. 1411-1417. ISSN 0091-6765 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1104108

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Short-term exposure to ozone has been associated with increased daily mortality. The shape of the concentration-response relationship-and, in particular, if there is a threshold-is critical for estimating public health impacts. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the concentration-response relationship between daily ozone and mortality in five urban and five rural areas in the United Kingdom from 1993 to 2006. METHODS: We used Poisson regression, controlling for seasonality, temperature, and influenza, to investigate associations between daily maximum 8-hr ozone and daily all-cause mortality, assuming linear, linear-threshold, and spline models for all-year and season-specific periods. We examined sensitivity to adjustment for particles (urban areas only) and alternative temperature metrics. RESULTS: In all-year analyses, we found clear evidence for a threshold in the concentration response relationship between ozone and all-cause mortality in London at 65 mu g/m(3) [95% confidence interval (CI): 58, 83] but little evidence of a threshold in other urban or rural areas. Combined linear effect estimates for all-cause mortality were comparable for urban and rural areas: 0.48% (95% CI: 0.35, 0.60) and 0.58% (95% CI: 0.36, 0.81) per 10-mu g/m(3) increase in ozone concentrations, respectively. Seasonal analyses suggested thresholds in both urban and rural areas for effects of ozone during summer months. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that health impacts should be estimated across the whole ambient range of ozone using both threshold and nonthreshold models, and models stratified by season. Evidence of a threshold effect in London but not in other study areas requires further investigation. The public health impacts of exposure to ozone in rural areas should not be overlooked.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: concentration-response function, daily mortality, ozone, UK population, public-health benefits, air-pollution, time-series, metaanalysis, exposure, communities, origins, project, europe, models
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Social and Environmental Health Research
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 22814173
Web of Science ID: 309692600023
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/427558

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