Nurses' perceptions of universal health coverage and its implications for the Kenyan health sector


Koon, AD; Smith, L; Ndetei, D; Mutiso, V; Mendenhall, E; (2016) Nurses' perceptions of universal health coverage and its implications for the Kenyan health sector. Critical public health, 27 (1). pp. 28-38. ISSN 0958-1596 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/09581596.2016.1208362

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Abstract

Universal health coverage, comprehensive access to affordable and quality health services, is a key component of the newly adopted 2015 Sustainable Development Goals. Prior to the UN resolution, several countries began incorporating elements of universal health coverage into their domestic policy arenas. In 2013, the newly elected President of Kenya announced initiatives aimed at moving towards universal health coverage, which have proven to be controversial. Little is known about how frontline workers, increasingly politically active and responsible for executing these mandates, view these changes. To understand more about how actors make sense of universal health coverage policies, we conducted an interpretive policy analysis using well-established methods from critical policy studies. This study utilized in-depth semi-structured interviews from a cross section of 60 nurses in three health facilities (public and private) in Kenya. Nurses were found to be largely unfamiliar with universal health coverage and interpreted it in myriad ways. One policy in particular, free maternal health care, was interpreted positively in theory and negatively in practice. Nurses often relied on symbolic language to express powerlessness in the wake of significant health systems reform. Study participants linked many of these frustrations to disorganization in the health sector as well as the changing political landscape in Kenya. These interpretations provide insight into charged policy positions held by frontline workers that threaten to interrupt service delivery and undermine the movement towards universal health coverage in Kenya.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Interpretive policy analysis, universal health coverage, Kenya, removing user fees, policy-analysis, countries, africa, care, need, Public, Environmental & Occupational Health, Biomedical Social Sciences
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Global Health and Development
Web of Science ID: 390126800004
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/3979667

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