Determinants of morbidity associated with infant male circumcision: community-level population-based study in rural Ghana.


Gyan, T; McAuley, K; Strobel, NA; Shannon, C; Newton, S; Tawiah-Agyemang, C; Amenga-Etego, S; Owusu-Agyei, S; Kirkwood, B; Edmond, KM; (2017) Determinants of morbidity associated with infant male circumcision: community-level population-based study in rural Ghana. Tropical medicine & international health , 22 (3). pp. 312-322. ISSN 1360-2276 DOI: 10.1111/tmi.12829

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

: Male circumcision services have expanded throughout Africa as part of a long-term HIV prevention strategy. We assessed the effect of type of service provider (formal and informal) and hygiene practices on circumcision-related morbidities in rural Ghana.<br/> : Population-based, cross-sectional study conducted between May and December 2012 involving 2850 circumcised infant males aged under 12 weeks. Multivariable logistic regression models were adjusted for maternal age, maternal education, income, birthweight and site of circumcision.<br/> : A total of 2850 (90.7%) infant males were circumcised. Overall, the risk of experiencing a morbidity (defined as complications occurring during or after the circumcision procedure as reported by the primary caregiver) was 8.1% (230). Risk was not significantly increased if the circumcision was performed by informal providers (121, 7.2%) vs. formal health service providers (109, 9.8%) [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.11, 95% CI 0.80-1.47, P = 0.456]. Poor hygiene practices were associated with significantly increased risk of morbidity: no handwashing [148 (11.7%)] (aOR 1.78, 95% CI 1.27-2.52, P = 0.001); not cleaning circumcision instruments [174 (10.6%)] (aOR 1.80, 95% CI 1.27-2.54, P = 0.001); and uncleaned penile area [190 (10.0%)] (aOR 1.84, 95% CI 1.25-2.70, P = 0.002).<br/> : The risk of morbidity after infant male circumcision in rural Ghana is high, chiefly due to poor hygiene practices. Governmental and non-governmental organisations need to improve training of circumcision providers in hygiene practices in sub-Saharan Africa.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
PubMed ID: 27990718
Web of Science ID: 395083700006
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/3234057

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
38Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item