Changes in the prevalence of cigarette smoking and quitting smoking determinants in adult inhabitants of rural areas in Poland between 2003 and 2012.


Sozańska, B; Pearce, N; Błaszczyk, M; Boznański, A; Cullinan, P; (2016) Changes in the prevalence of cigarette smoking and quitting smoking determinants in adult inhabitants of rural areas in Poland between 2003 and 2012. Public health, 141. pp. 178-184. ISSN 0033-3506 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2016.09.024

This is the latest version of this item. Earlier version may have full text manuscript

[img]
Preview
Text - Accepted Version
License:

Download (408kB) | Preview

Abstract

We investigate trends in the prevalence of cigarette smoking among adults at all ages in two time points 9 years apart in two neighbouring rural populations and examine social and respiratory health determinants of quitting smoking. Repeated cross-sectional study. Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted in the same rural area of lower Silesia in Poland in 2003 and 2012. A total of 1328 (91% of adult eligible individuals) in 2003 and 1449 (92% of eligible) in 2012 adult inhabitants were surveyed, 908 people (560 villagers and 348 town inhabitants) participated in both surveys. Participants completed a questionnaire on smoking behaviour, education level and respiratory diseases. Current smoking was higher in the villages than the town, among men than women and those with a middle level of education. The prevalence of current smokers decreased over time, although this decline was much more pronounced in the town than in the villages (30.2% vs 23% and 35.5% vs 33.7%, respectively). Men were more likely to stop smoking than women both in villages and in town. The prevalence of current smokers among village women even increased between the two surveys from 27.6% to 29.3%. Respiratory diseases did not influence quitting smoking. The degree of decreasing trend in smoking prevalence varied considerably within neighbouring populations. It was mainly seen in the town and among younger people. Men and those better educated were more willing to quit smoking. The discrepancies between two close rural populations indicates the need for an individual approach when designing programs of tobacco control.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Medical Statistics
PubMed ID: 27931996
Web of Science ID: 390639900028
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/3209457

Available Versions of this Item

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
16Downloads
22Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item