Feeding the world healthily: the challenge of measuring the effects of agriculture on health.


Hawkesworth, S; Dangour, AD; Johnston, D; Lock, K; Poole, N; Rushton, J; Uauy, R; Waage, J; (2010) Feeding the world healthily: the challenge of measuring the effects of agriculture on health. Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London Series B, Biological sciences, 365 (1554). pp. 3083-97. ISSN 0962-8436 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2010.0122

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
License:

Download (280kB) | Preview

Abstract

Agricultural production, food systems and population health are intimately linked. While there is a strong evidence base to inform our knowledge of what constitutes a healthy human diet, we know little about actual food production or consumption in many populations and how developments in the food and agricultural system will affect dietary intake patterns and health. The paucity of information on food production and consumption is arguably most acute in low- and middle-income countries, where it is most urgently needed to monitor levels of under-nutrition, the health impacts of rapid dietary transition and the increasing 'double burden' of nutrition-related disease. Food availability statistics based on food commodity production data are currently widely used as a proxy measure of national-level food consumption, but using data from the UK and Mexico we highlight the potential pitfalls of this approach. Despite limited resources for data collection, better systems of measurement are possible. Important drivers to improve collection systems may include efforts to meet international development goals and partnership with the private sector. A clearer understanding of the links between the agriculture and food system and population health will ensure that health becomes a critical driver of agricultural change.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Health Services Research and Policy
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
ECOHOST - The Centre for Health and Social Change
PubMed ID: 20713404
Web of Science ID: 281922800023
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/3119

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
598Downloads
366Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item