Assessing the impact of defining a global priority research agenda to address HIV-associated tuberculosis.


Odone, A; Matteelli, A; Chiesa, V; Cella, P; Ferrari, A; Pezzetti, F; Signorelli, C; Getahun, H; (2016) Assessing the impact of defining a global priority research agenda to address HIV-associated tuberculosis. Tropical medicine & international health , 21 (11). pp. 1420-1427. ISSN 1360-2276 DOI: 10.1111/tmi.12768

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Abstract

: In 2010, the WHO issued 77 priority research questions (PRQs) to address HIV-associated TB. Objective of the this study was to assess the impact of defining the research agenda in stimulating and directing research around priority research questions.<br/> : We used number and type of scientific publications as a proxy to quantitatively assess the impact of research agenda setting. We conducted 77 single systematic reviews - one for every PRQ - building 77 different search strategies using PRQs' keywords. Multivariate logistic regression models were applied to assess the quantity and quality of research produced over time and accounting for selected covariates.<br/> : In 2009-2015, PRQs were addressed by 1631 publications (median: 11 studies published per PRQ, range 1-96). The most published area was 'Intensified TB case finding' (median: 23 studies/PRQ, range: 2-74). The majority (62.1%, n = 1013) were published as original studies, and more than half (58%, n = 585) were conducted in the African region. Original studies' publication increased over the study period (P trend = <0.001). They focused more on the 'Intensified TB case finding' (OR = 2.17, 95% CI: 1.56-2.93) and 'Drug-resistant TB and HIV infection' (OR = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.47-3.06) areas than non-original studies. Original studies were published in journals of lower impact factor and received a smaller number of citations than non-original studies (OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.42-0.69).<br/> : The generation of evidence to address PRQs has increased over time particularly in selected fields. Setting a priority research agenda for HIV-associated TB might have positively influenced the direction and the conduct of research and contributed to the global response to such a major threat to health.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Health Services Research and Policy
Research Centre: TB Centre
PubMed ID: 27576587
Web of Science ID: 388283900006
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2836950

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