Investigating obesity as a risk factor for influenza-like illness during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic using the Health Survey for England.


Murphy, R; Fragaszy, EB; Hayward, AC; Warren-Gash, C; (2016) Investigating obesity as a risk factor for influenza-like illness during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic using the Health Survey for England. Influenza and other respiratory viruses, 11 (1). pp. 66-73. ISSN 1750-2640 DOI: 10.1111/irv.12420

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Abstract

: Following the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, obesity was shown to be associated with severe influenza outcomes. It remains unclear whether obesity was a risk factor for milder influenza-like illness (ILI).<br/> : To determine whether obesity was associated with an increased risk of self-reported ILI during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic using Health Survey for England (HSE) 2010 cross-sectional data.<br/> : This study used HSE data collected from English households between January and December 2010. Weight and height measurements were taken by trained fieldworkers to determine obesity. ILI was defined as a positive response to the question "Have you had a flu-like illness where you felt feverish and had a cough or sore throat?" with illness occurring between May and December 2009. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between obesity and ILI.<br/> : The study comprised 8407 participants (6984 adults, 1436 children), among whom 24.7% (95% CI: 23.6-25.9) were classified as obese. Of obese participants, 12.8% (95% CI: 11.1-14.8) reported ILI compared to 11.8% (95% CI: 10.8-12.8) of non-obese participants. The adjusted OR for ILI associated with obesity was 1.16 (95% CI: 0.98-1.38, P=.093). For adults and children, the adjusted ORs were 1.16 (95% CI: 0.97-1.38, P=.101) and 1.26 (95% CI: 0.72-2.21, P=.422), respectively.<br/> : Household survey data showed no evidence that obesity was associated with an increase in self-reported ILI during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in England. Further studies using active prospective ILI surveillance combined with laboratory reporting would reduce bias and improve accuracy of outcome measurements.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
PubMed ID: 27480326
Web of Science ID: 394959800009
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2717888

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