Provision of contraception after emergency contraception from the pharmacy: evaluating the acceptability of pharmacy for providing sexual and reproductive health services.


Michie, L; Cameron, ST; Glasier, A; Chen, ZE; Milne, D; Wilson, S; (2016) Provision of contraception after emergency contraception from the pharmacy: evaluating the acceptability of pharmacy for providing sexual and reproductive health services. Public health, 135. pp. 97-103. ISSN 0033-3506 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2015.11.017

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Community pharmacies in the United Kingdom (UK) provide sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services such as emergency contraception (EC), although there is scope for provision of additional services. We conducted a pilot study of pharmacy based interventions for initiating effective contraception after EC. By determining the views of participating women and pharmacists we aimed to identify barriers and facilitators to providing interventions from pharmacies routinely.<br/> STUDY DESIGN: In the pilot study, women presenting for levonorgestrel EC to community pharmacies, were provided with either standard care or one of two interventions: one packet of progestogen-only pills (POPs); or an invitation to present the empty EC packet to a local family planning clinic for contraception. A sample of women participating were asked to undergo a further interview. Operational difficulties with research in the community pharmacy were also documented by the research team.<br/> METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 women, four from each arm of the pilot study, using a standardised topic guide. Pre- and post-study interviews were conducted with the pharmacists involved.<br/> RESULTS: All women welcomed the interventions indicating the benefit of having different options available. They also identified possible advantages and disadvantages of each intervention. All pharmacists were positive about their involvement in the study. Methodological problems included difficulty in retention of participating pharmacists, slow recruitment and failure to accurately complete study paperwork.<br/> CONCLUSIONS: Women welcomed the interventions offered. Pharmacists viewed their participation in the study positively. The problems encountered provide valuable feedback to inform the development larger scale studies of such interventions.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Social and Environmental Health Research
PubMed ID: 26787315
Web of Science ID: 377414200013
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2537129

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