Are HIV-positive presumptive tuberculosis patients without tuberculosis getting the care they need in Zimbabwe?


Dlodlo, RA; Hwalima, ZE; Sithole, S; Takarinda, KC; Tayler-Smith, K; Harries, AD; (2015) Are HIV-positive presumptive tuberculosis patients without tuberculosis getting the care they need in Zimbabwe? Public health action, 5 (4). pp. 217-21. ISSN 2220-8372 DOI: https://doi.org/10.5588/pha.15.0036

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Abstract

Emakhandeni Clinic provides decentralised and integrated tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. To compare HIV care for presumptive TB patients with and without TB registered in 2013. Retrospective cohort study using routine programme data. Of 422 registered presumptive TB patients, 26% were already known to be HIV-positive. Among the remaining 315 patients, 255 (81%) were tested for HIV, of whom 190 (75%) tested HIV-positive. Of these, 26% were diagnosed with TB and 71% without TB (3% had no TB result recorded). For the 134 patients without TB, antiretroviral treatment (ART) eligibility data were recorded for 42 (31%); 95% of these were ART eligible. Initiation of cotrimoxazole preventive therapy (CPT) and ART was recorded for respectively 88% and 90% of HIV-positive patients with TB compared with respectively 40% and 38% of HIV-positive patients without TB (P < 0.001). Presumptive TB patients without TB had a high HIV positivity rate and, for those with available data, most were ART eligible. Unlike HIV-positive patients diagnosed with TB, CPT and ART uptake for these patients was poor. A 'test and treat' approach and better service linkages could be life-saving for these patients, especially in southern Africa, where there are high burdens of HIV and TB. Abstract available from the publisher. Abstract available from the publisher.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
PubMed ID: 26767174
Web of Science ID: 375451900006
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2528188

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