The effects of micronutrient-fortified complementary/replacement food on intestinal permeability and systemic markers of inflammation among maternally HIV-exposed and unexposed Zambian infants.


Mullen, A; Gosset, L; Larke, N; Manno, D; Chisenga, M; Kasonka, L; Filteau, S; (2012) The effects of micronutrient-fortified complementary/replacement food on intestinal permeability and systemic markers of inflammation among maternally HIV-exposed and unexposed Zambian infants. The British journal of nutrition, 107 (6). pp. 893-902. ISSN 0007-1145 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114511003734

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Abstract

: The present randomised trial investigated the effects of feeding Zambian infants from 6 to 18 months old either a richly or basal micronutrient-fortified complementary/replacement food on gut integrity and systemic inflammation. Blood samples were obtained from all infants (n 743) at 6 and 18 months for the assessment of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). A subsample of 502 infants, selected from the main cohort to include a larger proportion of infants with HIV-positive mothers, was assigned to lactulose/mannitol gut permeability tests. Lactulose:mannitol (L:M) ratio analyses were adjusted for baseline urinary L:M ratio, socio-economic status, mother's education, season of birth and baseline stunting, and stratified by maternal antenatal HIV status, child's sex, concurrent breast-feeding status and anaemia at baseline. There was no significant difference in geometric mean L:M ratio between the richly fortified and basal-fortified porridge arms at 12 months (0·47 (95 % CI 0·41, 0·55) v. 0·41 (95 % CI 0·34, 0·49); P = 0·16 adjusted). At 18 months, the richly fortified porridge group had a significantly higher geometric mean L:M ratio than the basal-fortified group (0·23 (95 % CI 0·19, 0·28) v. 0·15 (95 % CI 0·12, 0·19); P = 0·02 adjusted). This effect was evident for all stratifications, significantly among boys (P = 0·04), among the infants of HIV-negative mothers (P = 0·01), among the infants of HIV-negative mothers not concurrently breast-fed (P = 0·01) and among those who were not anaemic at baseline (P = 0·03). CRP, but not AGP, was positively associated with L:M ratio, but there were no significant effects of the diet on either CRP or AGP. In conclusion, a richly fortified complementary/replacement food did not benefit and may have worsened intestinal permeability.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Research Centre: Tropical Epidemiology Group
PubMed ID: 21899803
Web of Science ID: 300559100016
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/248

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