Modelling inhalation exposure to combustion-related air pollutants in residential buildings: Application to health impact assessment


Milner, J; Vardoulakis, S; Chalabi, Z; Wilkinson, P; (2010) Modelling inhalation exposure to combustion-related air pollutants in residential buildings: Application to health impact assessment. Environment international, 37 (1). pp. 268-279. ISSN 0160-4120 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2010.08.015

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Abstract

Buildings in developed countries are becoming increasingly airtight as a response to stricter energy efficiency requirements. At the same time, changes are occurring to the ways in which household energy is supplied, distributed and used. These changes are having important impacts on exposure to indoor air pollutants in residential buildings and present new challenges for professionals interested in assessing the effects of housing on public health. In many circumstances, models are the most appropriate way with which to examine the potential outcomes of future environmental and/or building interventions and policies. As such, there is a need to consider the current state of indoor air pollution exposure modelling. Various indoor exposure modelling techniques are available, ranging from simple statistical regression and mass-balance approaches, to more complex multizone and computational fluid dynamics tools that have correspondingly large input data requirements. This review demonstrates that there remain challenges which limit the applicability of current models to health impact assessment. However, these issues also present opportunities for better integration of indoor exposure modelling and epidemiology in the future. The final part of the review describes the application of indoor exposure models to health impact assessments, given current knowledge and data, and makes recommendations aimed at improving model predictions in the future.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Social and Environmental Health Research
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 20875687
Web of Science ID: 285662600033
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2183

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