Factors associated with recently acquired hepatitis C virus infection in people who inject drugs in England, Wales and Northern Ireland: new findings from an unlinked anonymous monitoring survey


Cullen, KJ; Hope, VD; Croxford, S; Shute, J; Ncube, F; Parry, JV; (2014) Factors associated with recently acquired hepatitis C virus infection in people who inject drugs in England, Wales and Northern Ireland: new findings from an unlinked anonymous monitoring survey. Epidemiology and infection, 143 (7). pp. 1398-1407. ISSN 0950-2688 DOI: 10.1017/S0950268814002040

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Abstract

Monitoring infections and risk in people who inject drugs (PWID) is important for informing public health responses. In 2011, a novel hepatitis C antibody (anti-HCV) avidity-testing algorithm to identify samples compatible with recent primary infection was introduced into a national surveillance survey. PWID are recruited annually, through >60 needle-and-syringe programmes and prescribing services. Of the 980 individuals that could have been at risk of HCV infection, there were 20 (2%) samples that were compatible with recent primary infection. These were more common among: those imprisoned ⩾5 times [8/213; adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 8·7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2·04-37·03]; women (8/230; aOR 3·8, 95% CI 1·41-10·38); and those ever-infected with hepatitis B (5/56; aOR 6·25, 95% CI 2·12-18·43). This study is the first to apply this algorithm and to examine the risk factors associated with recently acquired HCV infection in a national sample of PWID in the UK. These findings highlight underlying risks and suggest targeted interventions are needed.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Social and Environmental Health Research
PubMed ID: 25119383
Web of Science ID: 352706700007
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2167251

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