Relationships of Perfluorooctanoate and Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Serum Concentrations Between Child-Mother Pairs in a Population with Perfluorooctanoate Exposure from Drinking Water.


Mondal, D; Lopez-Espinosa, MJ; Armstrong, B; Stein, CR; Fletcher, T; (2012) Relationships of Perfluorooctanoate and Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Serum Concentrations Between Child-Mother Pairs in a Population with Perfluorooctanoate Exposure from Drinking Water. Environmental health perspectives, 120 (5). pp. 752-7. ISSN 0091-6765 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1104538

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
License:

Download (104kB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There are limited data on the associations between maternal or newborn and child exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), including perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). This study provides an opportunity to assess the association between PFAA concentrations in mother-child pairs in a population exposed to PFOA via drinking water.<br/> OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the relationship between mother-child PFAA serum concentrations and to examine how the child:mother ratio varies with child's age, child's sex, drinking-water PFOA concentration, reported bottled water use, and mother's breast-feeding intention.<br/> METHODS: We studied 4,943 mother-child pairs (children, 1-19 years of age). The child:mother PFAA ratio was stratified by possible determinants. Results are summarized as geometric mean ratios and correlation coefficients between mother-child pairs, overall and within strata.<br/> RESULTS: Child and mother PFOA and PFOS concentrations were correlated (r = 0.82 and 0.26, respectively). Up to about 12 years of age, children had higher serum PFOA concentrations than did their mothers. The highest child:mother PFOA ratio was found among children ≤ 5 years (44% higher than their mothers), which we attribute to in utero exposure and to exposure via breast milk and drinking water. Higher PFOS concentrations in children persisted until at least 19 years of age (42% higher than their mothers). Boys > 5 years of age had significantly higher PFOA and PFOS child:mother ratios than did girls.<br/> CONCLUSION: Concentrations of both PFOA and PFOS tended to be higher in children than in their mothers. This difference persisted until they were about 12 years of age for PFOA and at least 19 years of age for PFOS.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Social and Environmental Health Research
PubMed ID: 22271837
Web of Science ID: 303546000042
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/21176

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
312Downloads
306Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item