Comparison of Routine Health Management Information System Versus Enhanced Inpatient Malaria Surveillance for Estimating the Burden of Malaria Among Children Admitted to Four Hospitals in Uganda.


Mpimbaza, A; Miles, M; Sserwanga, A; Kigozi, R; Wanzira, H; Rubahika, D; Nasr, S; Kapella, BK; Yoon, SS; Chang, M; Yeka, A; Staedke, SG; Kamya, MR; Dorsey, G; (2014) Comparison of Routine Health Management Information System Versus Enhanced Inpatient Malaria Surveillance for Estimating the Burden of Malaria Among Children Admitted to Four Hospitals in Uganda. The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene, 92 (1). pp. 18-21. ISSN 0002-9637 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.14-0284

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Abstract

: The primary source of malaria surveillance data in Uganda is the Health Management Information System (HMIS), which does not require laboratory confirmation of reported malaria cases. To improve data quality, an enhanced inpatient malaria surveillance system (EIMSS) was implemented with emphasis on malaria testing of all children admitted in select hospitals. Data were compared between the HMIS and the EIMSS at four hospitals over a period of 12 months. After the implementation of the EIMSS, over 96% of admitted children under 5 years of age underwent laboratory testing for malaria. The HMIS significantly overreported the proportion of children under 5 years of age admitted with malaria (average absolute difference = 19%, range = 8-27% across the four hospitals) compared with the EIMSS. To improve the quality of the HMIS data for malaria surveillance, the National Malaria Control Program should, in addition to increasing malaria testing rates, focus on linking laboratory test results to reported malaria cases.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Pathogen Molecular Biology
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
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PubMed ID: 25422396
Web of Science ID: 348180600007
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2030936

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