Job strain and alcohol intake: a collaborative meta-analysis of individual-participant data from 140,000 men and women


Heikkilä, K; Nyberg, ST; Fransson, EI; Alfredsson, L; De Bacquer, D; Bjorner, JB; Bonenfant, S; Borritz, M; Burr, H; Clays, E; Casini, A; Dragano, N; Erbel, R; Geuskens, GA; Goldberg, M; Hooftman, WE; Houtman, IL; Joensuu, M; Jöckel, KH; Kittel, F; Knutsson, A; Koskenvuo, M; Koskinen, A; Kouvonen, A; Leineweber, C; Lunau, T; Madsen, IE; Magnusson Hanson, LL; Marmot, MG; Nielsen, ML; Nordin, M; Pentti, J; Salo, P; Rugulies, R; Steptoe, A; Siegrist, J; Suominen, S; Vahtera, J; Virtanen, M; Väänänen, A; Westerholm, P; Westerlund, H; Zins, M; Theorell, T; Hamer, M; Ferrie, JE; Singh-Manoux, A; Batty, GD; Kivimäki, M; IPD-Work Consortium, ; (2012) Job strain and alcohol intake: a collaborative meta-analysis of individual-participant data from 140,000 men and women. PLoS One, 7 (7). e40101. ISSN 1932-6203 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0040101

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Abstract

: The relationship between work-related stress and alcohol intake is uncertain. In order to add to the thus far inconsistent evidence from relatively small studies, we conducted individual-participant meta-analyses of the association between work-related stress (operationalised as self-reported job strain) and alcohol intake.<br/> : We analysed cross-sectional data from 12 European studies (n = 142 140) and longitudinal data from four studies (n = 48 646). Job strain and alcohol intake were self-reported. Job strain was analysed as a binary variable (strain vs. no strain). Alcohol intake was harmonised into the following categories: none, moderate (women: 1-14, men: 1-21 drinks/week), intermediate (women: 15-20, men: 22-27 drinks/week) and heavy (women: >20, men: >27 drinks/week). Cross-sectional associations were modelled using logistic regression and the results pooled in random effects meta-analyses. Longitudinal associations were examined using mixed effects logistic and modified Poisson regression. Compared to moderate drinkers, non-drinkers and (random effects odds ratio (OR): 1.10, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.14) and heavy drinkers (OR: 1.12, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.26) had higher odds of job strain. Intermediate drinkers, on the other hand, had lower odds of job strain (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.86, 0.99). We found no clear evidence for longitudinal associations between job strain and alcohol intake.<br/> : Our findings suggest that compared to moderate drinkers, non-drinkers and heavy drinkers are more likely and intermediate drinkers less likely to report work-related stress.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Adult, Alcohol Drinking/*epidemiology, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Risk Factors, Stress, Psychological/*epidemiology, Workplace, Young Adult, Adult, Alcohol Drinking, epidemiology, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Risk Factors, Stress, Psychological, epidemiology, Workplace, Young Adult
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Health Services Research and Policy
PubMed ID: 22792218
Web of Science ID: 306461800038
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/2025529

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