The interrelation of HIV, cervical human papillomavirus, and neoplasia among antenatal clinic attenders in Tanzania


Mayaud, P; Gill, DK; Weiss, HA; Uledi, E; Kopwe, L; Todd, J; Ka-Gina, G; Grosskurth, H; Hayes, RJ; Mabey, DC; Lacey, CJ; (2001) The interrelation of HIV, cervical human papillomavirus, and neoplasia among antenatal clinic attenders in Tanzania. Sexually transmitted infections, 77 (4). pp. 248-54. ISSN 1368-4973

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and interrelation of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes, squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL), HIV, and other reproductive tract infections (RTIs) among urban antenatal clinic attenders in Mwanza, Tanzania. METHODS: Genital swabs were collected from 660 pregnant women and tested for a range of RTIs and for cervical cytology. Cervical HPV-DNA was detected by PCR and genotyped. HIV and syphilis serologies were performed. RESULTS: HPV prevalence was 34% (209/612 women). Of the 144 typeable samples, 83% were high risk (HR-HPV) oncogenic strains (56% HPV 16 related types). SIL was detected in 43 women (7%), with high grade SIL in 3%. There was a high prevalence of HIV (15%), and of any RTI (83%). Genital warts were detected in 20 women (3%). HPV infection was associated with some behavioural factors (short duration of relationship, single status, not using condoms) and gonorrhoea. There was no overall association between HPV and HIV (OR=1.02, 95% CI 0.6-1.6), but a non-significant trend towards a stronger association with HR-HPV in women aged 15-19 (OR=2.79, 95% CI 0.8-9.5) and women aged > or =30 (OR=3.20, 95% CI 0.7-15). SIL was associated with HPV (OR=3.66, 95% CI 1.9-7.0), but not significantly with HIV (OR=1.54, 95% CI 0.7-3.4). Prevalence of SIL was higher among women dually positive for HPV/HIV compared to HPV infection only (21% v 12%), although this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.17). CONCLUSIONS: HPV infection was highly prevalent in this young antenatal population. The association of HIV with HR-HPV types in older women may suggest that the principal HIV/HPV interaction in this population is for HIV to upregulate HPV persistence, leading to subsequent development of SIL.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/*complications/epidemiology, Cervix Neoplasms/*complications/epidemiology, Condylomata Acuminata/complications/epidemiology, Confidence Intervals, Cross-Sectional Studies, DNA, Viral/analysis, Female, Genotype, Gonorrhea/complications/epidemiology, HIV Infections/*complications/epidemiology, Human, Logistic Models, Marital Status, Odds Ratio, Papillomavirus, Human/isolation & purification, Papovaviridae Infections/*complications/epidemiology, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Pregnancy, *Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology, Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic/epidemiology, Prevalence, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Syphilis/complications/epidemiology, Tanzania/epidemiology, Tumor Virus Infections/*complications/epidemiology, Adolescence, Adult, Age Factors, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia, complications, epidemiology, Cervix Neoplasms, complications, epidemiology, Condylomata Acuminata, complications, epidemiology, Confidence Intervals, Cross-Sectional Studies, DNA, Viral, analysis, Female, Genotype, Gonorrhea, complications, epidemiology, HIV Infections, complications, epidemiology, Human, Logistic Models, Marital Status, Odds Ratio, Papillomavirus, Human, isolation & purification, Papovaviridae Infections, complications, epidemiology, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, epidemiology, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, epidemiology, Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic, epidemiology, Prevalence, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Syphilis, complications, epidemiology, Tanzania, epidemiology, Tumor Virus Infections, complications, epidemiology
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Population Studies (1974-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
Tropical Epidemiology Group
Population Studies Group
PubMed ID: 11463923
Web of Science ID: 170245100005
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/16329

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