The infectious intestinal disease study of England: a prospective evaluation of symptoms and health care use after an acute episode


Cumberland, P; Sethi, D; Roderick, PJ; Wheeler, JG; Cowden, JM; Roberts, JA; Rodrigues, LC; Hudson, MJ; Tompkins, DS; (2003) The infectious intestinal disease study of England: a prospective evaluation of symptoms and health care use after an acute episode. Epidemiology and infection, 130 (3). pp. 453-60. ISSN 0950-2688 DOI: 10.1017/S0950268803008410

[img]
Preview
Text - Published Version
License: Copyright the publishers

Download (106Kb) | Preview

Abstract

The sequelae of Infectious Intestinal Disease (IID) in a population-based sample of cases and matched controls were investigated for a period of 3 months following the initial infection. Incident cases of IID presenting to GPs or occurring in the community and controls were studied at 3 weeks and over a 3-month follow-up period. Cases were six times more likely than controls to have gastrointestinal symptoms, particularly diarrhoea, at 3 weeks. Ten per cent of cases consulted their GP in the 3 months after episode and 2.3% were referred to hospital. GP presentation rates were twice as high in cases. Gastrointestinal symptoms persist after IID, leading to an increased likelihood of GP consultation and hospital referral. Diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome may be more likely following IID. The burden of IID is likely to be considerable given its high incidence and the frequency of such sequelae.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Adolescent, Case-Control Studies, Child, Child Health Services/*utilization, Child, Preschool, Communicable Diseases/*epidemiology, England/epidemiology, Family Practice/*statistics & numerical data, Female, Human, Incidence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Intestinal Diseases/*epidemiology, Male, Multivariate Analysis, Prospective Studies, Referral and Consultation, Regression Analysis, Adolescent, Case-Control Studies, Child, Child Health Services, utilization, Child, Preschool, Communicable Diseases, epidemiology, England, epidemiology, Family Practice, statistics & numerical data, Female, Human, Incidence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Intestinal Diseases, epidemiology, Male, Multivariate Analysis, Prospective Studies, Referral and Consultation, Regression Analysis
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Global Health and Development
Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Health Services Research and Policy
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
Vaccine Centre
PubMed ID: 12825729
Web of Science ID: 183874400011
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/16210

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
187Downloads
339Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item