The effect of tuberculin skin testing on viral load and anti- mycobacterial immune responses in HIV-1-infected Ugandan adults


Mawa, PA; Pickering, JM; Miiro, G; Namujju, RB; Watera, C; Anyaegani, G; Whitworth, JAG; Elliott, AM; (2004) The effect of tuberculin skin testing on viral load and anti- mycobacterial immune responses in HIV-1-infected Ugandan adults. The international journal of tuberculosis and lung disease, 8 (5). pp. 586-92. ISSN 1027-3719

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether tuberculin skin testing (TST) is associated with an increase in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load, and to examine the effect of TST on anti-mycobacterial immune responses. DESIGN: A nested cohort study of HIV-1-infected adults. METHOD: Forty-two participants (21 TST-positive and 21 TST-negative) from a larger cohort were recruited to the study. Blood was collected for CD4+ T-cell count, whole blood was cultured, and plasma saved for viral load. These measurements were taken before, 3 days after, 3 months after, and 3 months plus 3 days after TST. Cytokine responses to culture filtrate proteins (CFP) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) were examined in the whole blood assay. RESULTS: Twenty-nine participants attended all four visits. No statistically significant change in viral load, CD4+ T-cell count, or cytokine response to PHA was observed at any visit. However, TST was associated with a transient increase in the interferon-gamma response to CFP and a lasting increase in the interleukin-5 response to CFP. CONCLUSION: There appeared to be a systemic effect of TST on the anti-tuberculosis immune response.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: tuberculosis, tuberculin skin testing, activation, cellular, factors/cytokines, cellular immunity, Mycobacterium-tuberculosis, infection, replication, vaccine, blood, assay
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Social and Environmental Health Research
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Immunology and Infection
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
TB Centre
PubMed ID: 15137535
Web of Science ID: 221256300013
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/14652

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