A plasmid immunization construct encoding urease B of Helicobacter pylori induces an antigen-specific antibody response and upregulates the expression of beta-defensins and IL-10 in the stomachs of immunized mice.


Hatzifoti, C; Bajaj-Elliott, M; Dorrell, N; Anyim, M; Prentice, MB; Nye, KE; Wren, B; Morrow, WJ; (2004) A plasmid immunization construct encoding urease B of Helicobacter pylori induces an antigen-specific antibody response and upregulates the expression of beta-defensins and IL-10 in the stomachs of immunized mice. Vaccine, 22 (20). pp. 2651-9. ISSN 0264-410X DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2003.11.056

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Abstract

The objectives of this study were to investigate the efficacy of a prototype DNA immunization construct encoding the urease B subunit enzyme of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) for inducing adaptive and innate immune responses in mice immunized via intramuscular or subcutaneous routes and to further explore the adjuvant effects of the CpG motifs in the vector. Antibody, cytokine, and beta-defensin profiles were assessed in the stomachs of immunized animals: experiments were terminated 3 months after immunization because there was a significant increase in the anti-H. pylori urease B antibody response at Week 6 in mice immunized with the urease B construct. A long lasting expression of IL-10 mRNA was noted. Furthermore, a marked and sustained increase in the mRNA expression of beta-defensins was also observed, particularly beta1. This study demonstrates that an H. pylori urease B DNA construct can induce innate as well as adaptive immune responses in the stomachs of immunized mice. Upregulation of beta-defensin gene expression followed immunization and we believe that this is the first report of a DNA vaccine inducing innate anti-microbial responses. Such complex molecular interactions that modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses may be of critical importance in the control of mucosal pathogens, such as H. pylori.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Pathogen Molecular Biology
PubMed ID: 15193391
Web of Science ID: 222413000018
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/14400

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