Knowledge of malaria influences the use of insecticide treated nets but not intermittent presumptive treatment by pregnant women in Tanzania


Nganda, RY; Drakeley, C; Reyburn, H; Marchant, T; (2004) Knowledge of malaria influences the use of insecticide treated nets but not intermittent presumptive treatment by pregnant women in Tanzania. Malaria Journal, 3. art. no.. ISSN 1475-2875 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-3-42

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Abstract

Background: To reduce the intolerable burden of malaria in pregnancy, the Ministry of Health in Tanzania has recently adopted a policy of intermittent presumptive treatment for pregnant women using sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP). In addition, there is strong national commitment to increase distribution of insecticide treated nets (ITNs) among pregnant women. This study explores the determinants of uptake for both ITNs and IPTp-SP by pregnant women and the role that individual knowledge and socio-economic status has to play for each. Methods: 293 women were recruited post-partum at Kibaha District Hospital on the East African coast. The haemoglobin level of each woman was measured and a questionnaire administered. Results: Use of both interventions was associated with a reduced risk of severe anaemia (Hb< 8 g/dL) compared to women who had used neither intervention ( OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.14 - 0.67). In a logistic regression model it was found that attendance at MCH health education sessions was the only factor that predicted IPTp-SP use ( OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1 - 2.9) while high knowledge of malaria predicted use of ITNs ( OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1 - 4.9). Conclusion: Individual knowledge of malaria was an important factor for ITN uptake, but not for IPTp-SP use, which was reliant on delivery of information by MCH systems. When both these interventions were used, severe anaemia postpartum was reduced by 69% compared to use of neither, thus providing evidence of effectiveness of these interventions when used in combination.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, controlled-trial, anemia, prevent, burden, health, kenya, area
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Immunology and Infection
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
PubMed ID: 15541178
Web of Science ID: 225787600005
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/13947

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