Growth rates of black soldier fly larvae fed on fresh human faeces and their implication for improving sanitation.


Banks, IJ; Gibson, WT; Cameron, MM; (2014) Growth rates of black soldier fly larvae fed on fresh human faeces and their implication for improving sanitation. Tropical medicine & international health, 19 (1). pp. 14-22. ISSN 1360-2276 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/tmi.12228

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the capacity of black soldier fly larvae (BSFL) (Hermetia illucens) to convert fresh human faeces into larval biomass under different feeding regimes, and to determine how effective BSFL are as a means of human faecal waste management.<br/> METHODS: Black soldier fly larvae were fed fresh human faeces. The frequency of feeding, number of larvae and feeding ratio were altered to determine their effects on larval growth, prepupal weight, waste reduction, bioconversion and feed conversion rate (FCR).<br/> RESULTS: The larvae that were fed a single lump amount of faeces developed into significantly larger larvae and prepupae than those fed incrementally every 2 days; however, the development into pre-pupae took longer. The highest waste reduction was found in the group containing the most larvae, with no difference between feeding regimes. At an estimated 90% pupation rate, the highest bioconversion (16-22%) and lowest, most efficient FCR (2.0-3.3) occurred in groups that contained 10 and 100 larvae, when fed both the lump amount and incremental regime.<br/> CONCLUSION: The prepupal weight, bioconversion and FCR results surpass those from previous studies into BSFL management of swine, chicken manure and municipal organic waste. This suggests that the use of BSFL could provide a solution to the health problems associated with poor sanitation and inadequate human waste management in developing countries.<br/>

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
PubMed ID: 24261901
Web of Science ID: 328349000002
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1367684

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
336Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item