The effect of scientific misconduct on the results of clinical trials: A Delphi survey.


Al-Marzouki, S; Roberts, I; Marshall, T; Evans, S; (2005) The effect of scientific misconduct on the results of clinical trials: A Delphi survey. Contemporary clinical trials, 26 (3). pp. 331-7. ISSN 1551-7144 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2005.01.011

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To discover what types of scientific misconduct are most likely to influence the results of a clinical trial. DESIGN: Delphi survey of expert opinion with three rounds of consultation. SETTING: Non-industry clinical trial "community". PARTICIPANTS: Experts identified from invitees to a previous MRC consultation on clinical trials. 32 out of the 40 experts approached agreed to participate. RESULTS: We identified thirteen forms of scientific misconduct for which there was majority agreement (>50%) that they would be likely or very likely to distort the results and majority agreement (>50%) that they would be likely or very likely to occur. Of these, the over-interpretation of 'significant' findings in small trials, selective reporting and inappropriate subgroup analyses were the main themes. CONCLUSIONS: According to this expert group, the most important forms of scientific misconduct in clinical trials are selective reporting and the opportunistic use of the play of chance. Data fabrication and falsification were not rated highly because it was considered that these were unlikely to occur. Registration and publication of detailed clinical trial protocols could make an important contribution to preventing scientific misconduct.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Medical Statistics
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 15911467
Web of Science ID: 229954900008
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/13624

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
361Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item