Evaluation of synthetic repellents on mosquito nets in experimental huts against insecticide-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes.


N'guessan, R; Rowland, M; Moumouni, TL; Kesse, NB; Carnevale, P; (2006) Evaluation of synthetic repellents on mosquito nets in experimental huts against insecticide-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 100 (12). pp. 1091-1097. ISSN 0035-9203 DOI: 10.1016/j.trstmh.2006.04.005

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Abstract

Owing to the development of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae, there is a need to develop chemical alternatives for use on mosquito nets. Synthetic insect repellents are widely used for personal protection as skin or clothing applications. The efficacy of repellent-treated nets (RTN) was evaluated in experimental huts in Côte d'Ivoire against pyrethroid-resistant populations of An. gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus. The repellents tested were DEET (N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide) at 7.9g/m(2) and two formulations of ethyl butylacetylaminopropionate (IR3535) at 7.6g/m(2) and 7.3g/m(2). Over 45 nights there was a 74-82% reduction in the number of An. gambiae entering the huts containing RTNs but no significant reduction in entry of C. quinquefasciatus. There was a 63-64% reduction in the proportion of An. gambiae blood feeding but no reduction in the proportion of C. quinquefasciatus blood feeding in huts with RTNs. An unexpected result was the 69-76% mortality of An. gambiae and 51-61% mortality of C. quinquefasciatus in huts containing RTNs. Treated filter paper bioassays in WHO test kits confirmed that confined contact with DEET induces mortality. The DEET-based product provided better and longer protection; tunnel test bioassays confirmed that residual activity lasted for up to 6 weeks. Application of repellents to nets warrants further investigation and development.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
PubMed ID: 16963093
Web of Science ID: 242009500001
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/11116

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