Field evaluation of a rapid immunochromatographic dipstick test for the diagnosis of cholera in a high-risk population


Wang, XY; Ansaruzzaman, M; Vaz, R; Mondlane, C; Lucas, ME; von Seidlein, L; Deen, JL; Ampuero, S; Puri, M; Park, T; Nair, GB; Clemens, JD; Chaignat, CL; Rajerison, M; Nato, F; Fournier, JM; (2006) Field evaluation of a rapid immunochromatographic dipstick test for the diagnosis of cholera in a high-risk population. BMC Infect Dis, 6. p. 17. ISSN 1471-2334 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-6-17

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Early detection of cholera outbreaks is crucial for the implementation of the most appropriate control strategies. METHODS: The performance of an immunochromatographic dipstick test (Institute Pasteur, Paris, France) specific for Vibrio cholerae O1 was evaluated in a prospective study in Beira, Mozambique, during the 2004 cholera season (January-May). Fecal specimens were collected from 391 patients with acute watery nonbloody diarrhea and tested by dipstick and conventional culture. RESULTS: The overall sensitivity and specificity of the rapid test compared to culture were 95% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 91%-99%) and 89% (95% CI: 86%-93%), respectively. After stratification by type of sample (rectal swab/bulk stool) and severity of diarrhea, the sensitivity ranged between 85% and 98% and specificity between 77% and 97%. CONCLUSION: This one-step dipstick test performed well in the diagnosis of V. cholerae O1 in a setting with seasonal outbreaks where rapid tests are most urgently needed.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Adolescent, Adult, Child, Child, Preschool, Cholera/*diagnosis, Feces/microbiology, Female, Humans, Immunologic Tests/*instrumentation/*methods, Male, Mozambique, Risk, Sensitivity and Specificity, Adolescent, Adult, Child, Child, Preschool, Cholera, diagnosis, Feces, microbiology, Female, Humans, Immunologic Tests, instrumentation, methods, Male, Mozambique, Risk, Sensitivity and Specificity
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
PubMed ID: 16451731
Web of Science ID: 236024600001
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/10274

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