Self-other disagreement in personality assessment: significance and prognostic value.


Mosterman, RM; Hendriks, AA; (2011) Self-other disagreement in personality assessment: significance and prognostic value. Clinical psychology & psychotherapy, 18 (2). pp. 159-71. ISSN 1063-3995 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/cpp.708

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Abstract

The feasibility of the use of multiple informant reports in clinical practice was examined in a sample of 105 psychiatric outpatients who provided self-ratings and (2-3) informants' reports on the Five Factor Personality Inventory. The response rate was 97%. The patients assessed themselves as less extraverted and more emotionally stable than their proxies did. In addition, the significance of self-other disagreement was investigated. Our first hypothesis, stating that self-other disagreement would correlate with (personality) pathology, was confirmed: self-other disagreement predominantly occurred in introverted, shy, hostile and depressed persons who tended to have more personality problems and co-morbidity. We found no support for our second hypothesis, stating that self-other disagreement would predict a diminished therapy effect. An important finding, however, was that self-other disagreement proved to be a strong predictor of dropout. Furthermore, a decrease in depression, hostility and shyness was positively correlated with a decrease in self-other disagreement.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Health Services Research and Policy
PubMed ID: 21110408
Web of Science ID: 289266800006
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/1012242

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