Social and behavioural determinants of consistent condom use among hotel and bar workers in Northern Tanzania


Ao, T; Sam, N; Manongi, R; Seage, G; Kapiga, S; (2003) Social and behavioural determinants of consistent condom use among hotel and bar workers in Northern Tanzania. International journal of STD & AIDS, 14 (10). pp. 688-96. ISSN 0956-4624 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1258/095646203322387956

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Abstract

Bar and hotel workers (n=519) in Moshi, Tanzania were interviewed to obtain information about potential predictors of condom use. Samples were collected for the diagnosis of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV. Consistent condom use was defined as always using condoms with sexual partners in the past five years. Overall consistent condom use in this population was 14.1%. In multivariate analyses, consistent condom use was inversely associated with low condom self-efficacy (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.20; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.06-0.71), low condom knowledge (AOR, 0.11; CI, 0.01-0.80), and having more than three children (AOR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.09-0.54). Other significant predictors included perceived condom acceptability and using condoms when last exchanged sex for money or gift. These results indicate that increased specific condom knowledge, improved self-efficacy, and reduced social stigma could be effective strategies in the promotion of condom use in this population.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Adolescent, Adult, Condoms/*utilization, Female, HIV Infections/epidemiology/microbiology/prevention & control/virology, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Interviews, Male, Prevalence, Questionnaires, *Sexual Behavior, Sexually Transmitted Diseases/*epidemiology/microbiology/*prevention &, control/virology, Tanzania/epidemiology, *Workplace, Adolescent, Adult, Condoms, utilization, Female, HIV Infections, epidemiology, microbiology, prevention & control, virology, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Interviews, Male, Prevalence, Questionnaires, Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S., Sexual Behavior, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, epidemiology, microbiology, prevention & control, virology, Tanzania, epidemiology, Workplace
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 14596773
Web of Science ID: 185696600009
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/9895

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