Intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnancy in Africa: What's new, what's needed?


Vallely, A; Vallely, L; Changalucha, J; Greenwood, B; Chandramohan, D; (2007) Intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnancy in Africa: What's new, what's needed? Malaria Journal, 6. ISSN 1475-2875 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-6-16

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Abstract

Falciparum malaria is an important cause of maternal, perinatal and neonatal morbidity in high transmission settings in Sub-Saharan Africa. Intermittent preventive treatment with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP-IPT) has proven efficacious in reducing the burden of pregnancy-associated malaria but increasing levels of parasite resistance mean that the benefits of national SP-IPT programmes may soon be seriously undermined in much of the region. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop alternative drug regimens for IPT in pregnancy. This paper reviews published safety and efficacy data on various antimalarials and proposes several candidate combination regimens for assessment in phase II/III clinical trials.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: UNCOMPLICATED FALCIPARUM-MALARIA, PLUS SULFADOXINE-PYRIMETHAMINE, RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL, SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA, RESISTANT, PLASMODIUM-FALCIPARUM, SEXUALLY-TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS, MILLENNIUM, DEVELOPMENT GOALS, COST-EFFECTIVENESS ANALYSIS, IN-VITRO ACTIVITIES, ANTIMALARIAL-DRUGS, Africa, Antimalarials, pharmacology, therapeutic use, Clinical Trials, Phase II, Clinical Trials, Phase III, Disease Transmission, Horizontal, prevention & control, Drug Resistance, Female, Humans, Malaria, Falciparum, drug therapy, prevention & control, transmission, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Parasitic, drug therapy
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Malaria Centre
Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
PubMed ID: 17306014
Web of Science ID: 244743000001
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/9560

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