Is the Expanded Programme on Immunisation the most appropriate delivery system for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in West Africa?


Chandramohan, D; Webster, J; Smith, L; Awine, T; Owusu-Agyei, S; Carneiro, I; (2007) Is the Expanded Programme on Immunisation the most appropriate delivery system for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in West Africa? Tropical medicine & international health , 12 (6). pp. 743-750. ISSN 1360-2276 DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-3156.2007.01844.x

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Abstract

Objective To investigate the coverage and equity of the Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI) and its effect on age schedule, seasonality of malaria risk, and linked intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) in West Africa. Method Secondary analyses of data from a trial of IPT in Ghana. The potential effectiveness and impact of EPI-linked IPT in West Africa was calculated using the coverage of Diptheria Pertussis Tetanus vaccination obtained from national surveys and the reported protective efficacies of IPT. Results In West Africa, where the transmission of malaria is highly seasonal, only 10% of malaria episodes in infants would be averted with the current coverage of EPI. Conclusion In this setting, the EPI-linked IPT is not necessarily the most appropriate approach and alternative IPT schedules and delivery systems are needed.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: expanded programme on immunisation, intermittent preventive treatment, malaria, seasonality, coverage, ghana, Placebo-controlled trial, insecticide-treated bednets, routine, vaccinations, measles vaccination, equitable coverage, tanzanian, infants, child-mortality, health, interventions, eradication, Africa, Western, epidemiology, Age Distribution, Child, Child, Preschool, Delivery of Health Care, methods, Humans, Immunization Programs, methods, Incidence, Infant, Malaria, epidemiology, prevention & control, Malaria Vaccines, therapeutic use, Mothers, psychology, Seasons, Treatment Outcome
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Disease Control
Distance Learning
Academic Services & Administration > Distance Learning
Research Centre: Centre for Evaluation
Malaria Centre
Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
Vaccine Centre
PubMed ID: 17550471
Web of Science ID: 247175000006
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/9209

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