Influence of IL-10RA and IL-22 polymorphisms on outcome of hepatitis C virus infection.


Hennig, BJ; Frodsham, AJ; Hellier, S; Knapp, S; Yee, LJ; Wright, M; Zhang, L; Thomas, HC; Thursz, M; Hill, AV; (2007) Influence of IL-10RA and IL-22 polymorphisms on outcome of hepatitis C virus infection. Liver international, 27 (8). pp. 1134-43. ISSN 1478-3223 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1478-3231.2007.01518.x

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Abstract

Background: Two receptor chains, IL-10RA and IL-10RB, are known to mediate the functions of interleukin-10 (IL-10), which has been shown to be involved in the progression of persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Little information is available on the role of host genetic variation in IL-10 receptor genes and outcome of HCV infection. IL-22, an IL-10 homologue, shares the IL-10RB receptor chain with IL-10 and has antiviral properties. We investigated the possible role of polymorphisms in the IL-10RA and IL-22 genes in hepatitis C disease pathogenesis. Methods: This study population consisted of 631 HCV patients, recruited from several hepatology clinics across Europe. We genotyped four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL-10RA and six SNPs in the IL-22 gene by ligation detection reaction or restriction fragment length polymorphism. Outcome of HCV infection was assessed according to viral clearance, treatment response, severity of fibrosis and overall inflammation. Conclusions: Variation in IL-10RA appeared to be correlated with response to treatment and inflammation. Two SNPs in IL-22 affected treatment response and viral clearance respectively. We furthermore report on allele and haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium for IL-10RA and IL-22. Our results indicate that genetic variation in these genes may play a modulatory role in the outcome of hepatitis C infection.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 17845543
Web of Science ID: 249433200014
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/9138

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