What are the most effective ways of improving population health through transport interventions? Evidence from systematic reviews


Morrison, DS; Petticrew, M; Thomson, H; (2003) What are the most effective ways of improving population health through transport interventions? Evidence from systematic reviews. Journal of epidemiology and community health, 57 (5). pp. 327-33. ISSN 0143-005X DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/jech.57.5.327

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To review systematic review literature that describes the effectiveness of transport interventions in improving population health. METHODS: Systematic review methodology was used to evaluate published and unpublished systematic reviews in any language that described the measured health effects of any mode of transport intervention. MAIN RESULTS: 28 systematic reviews were identified. The highest quality reviews indicate that the most effective transport interventions to improve health are health promotion campaigns (to prevent childhood injuries, to increase bicycle and motorcycle helmet use, and to promote children's car seat and seatbelt use), traffic calming, and specific legislation against drink driving. Driver improvement and education courses are associated with increases in crash involvement and violations. CONCLUSIONS: Systematic reviews are able to provide evidence about effective ways of improving health through transport related interventions and also identify well intentioned but harmful interventions. Valuable additional information may exist in primary studies and systematic reviews have a role in evaluating and synthesising their findings.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Accidents, Traffic/legislation & jurisprudence/prevention & control, Alcohol Drinking/legislation & jurisprudence, Automobile Driving, Environment Design, Health Promotion/methods, Humans, Licensure, Public Health/*standards, *Review Literature, Risk Factors, Seat Belts, *Transportation, Wounds and Injuries/prevention & control, Accidents, Traffic, legislation & jurisprudence, prevention & control, Alcohol Drinking, legislation & jurisprudence, Automobile Driving, Environment Design, Health Promotion, methods, Humans, Licensure, Public Health, standards, Review Literature, Risk Factors, Seat Belts, Transportation, Wounds and Injuries, prevention & control
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Public Health and Policy > Dept of Social and Environmental Health Research
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 12700214
Web of Science ID: 182280700007
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/8734

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
295Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item