Fortified complementary foods with or without alpha-amylase treatment increase hemoglobin but do not reduce breast milk intake of 9-mo-old Zambian infants


Owino, VO; Kasonka, LM; Sinkala, MM; Wells, JK; Eaton, S; Darch, T; Coward, A; Tomkins, AM; Filteau, SM; (2007) Fortified complementary foods with or without alpha-amylase treatment increase hemoglobin but do not reduce breast milk intake of 9-mo-old Zambian infants. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 86 (4). pp. 1094-1103. ISSN 0002-9165

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Abstract

Background: Malnutrition in late infancy in developing countries may result from poor-quality complementary foods that displace breast milk. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the effects of fortified complementary blends of different energy densities on Growth, hemoglobin concentrations, and breast milk intake of 9-mo-old Zambian infants. Design: Infants were randomly assigned at 6 mo of age to receive for 3 mo a fortified blend of maize, beans, bambaranuts, and groundnuts [Chilenje Baby Mix (CBM); energy density: 68 kcal/100 g; n = 37] or a similar blend with a-amylase (CBMA; energy density: 106 kcal/100 2: n = 44). Cross-sectional data were obtained at 9 mo for a control Group of infants (n = 69) not given the diets. Breast milk intake was measured by using the dose-to-the-mother deuterium dilution technique. Results: No differences in weight or length z scores, all of which were within normal ranges, were seen between groups at 9 mo. Percentage fat mass was significantly (P = 0.01) greater in the infants in both the CBM (23.2 +/- 2.7%) and CBMA (23.4 +/- 2.5%) groups than in the control group (21.6 +/- 2.6%). Hemoglobin concentrations were significantly (P = 0.03) greater in both intervention groups (CBM group: 104 +/- 12 g/L: CBMA group: 103 +/- 12 g/L) than in the control group (98 +/- 14 g/L). Breast milk intake was not significantly (P = 0.87) different between groups (CBM group: 614 +/- 271 g/d; CBMA group: 635 +/- 193 g/d; control group: 653 +/- 221 g/d). Conclusions: The study foods improved hemoglobin concentrations without reducing breast milk intake and may be used to improve the nutritional status of infants in developing countries.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Adipose Tissue, metabolism, Body Composition, Body Height, drug effects, physiology, Body Weight, drug effects, physiology, Cross-Sectional Studies, Deuterium, Eating, drug effects, physiology, Energy Intake, physiology, Female, Food, Fortified, Hemoglobins, metabolism, Humans, Infant, Infant Food, standards, Infant Nutrition Physiology, drug effects, physiology, Male, Micronutrients, administration & dosage, metabolism, Milk, Human, chemistry, Nutritional Status, Nutritive Value, Weaning, Zambia, alpha-Amylase, administration & dosage, metabolism
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- )
Research Centre: Centre for Maternal, Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH)
PubMed ID: 17921388
Web of Science ID: 250134600028
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/8553

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