Relation between the Global Burden of Disease and Randomized Clinical Trials Conducted in Latin America Published in the Five Leading Medical Journals.


Perel, P; Miranda, JJ; Ortiz, Z; Casas, JP; (2008) Relation between the Global Burden of Disease and Randomized Clinical Trials Conducted in Latin America Published in the Five Leading Medical Journals. PLoS One, 3 (2). e1696. ISSN 1932-6203 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0001696

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Since 1990 non communicable diseases and injuries account for the majority of death and disability-adjusted life years in Latin America. We analyzed the relationship between the global burden of disease and Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) conducted in Latin America that were published in the five leading medical journals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: WE INCLUDED ALL RCTS IN HUMANS, EXCLUSIVELY CONDUCTED IN LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES, AND PUBLISHED IN ANY OF THE FOLLOWING JOURNALS: Annals of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, Journal of the American Medical Association, Lancet, and New England Journal of Medicine. We described the trials and reported the number of RCTs according to the main categories of the global burden of disease. Sixty-six RCTs were identified. Communicable diseases accounted for 38 (57%) reports. Maternal, perinatal, and nutritional conditions accounted for 19 (29%) trials. Non-communicable diseases represent 48% of the global burden of disease but only 14% of reported trials. No trial addressed injuries despite its 18% contribution to the burden of disease in 2000. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A poor correlation between the burden of disease and RCTs publications was found. Non communicable diseases and injuries account for up to two thirds of the burden of disease in Latin America but these topics are seldom addressed in published RCTs in the selected sample of journals. Funding bodies of health research and editors should be aware of the increasing burden of non communicable diseases and injuries occurring in Latin America to ensure that this growing epidemic is not neglected in the research agenda and not affected by publication bias.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Population Health (2012- ) > Dept of Nutrition and Public Health Interventions Research (2003-2012)
Research Centre: Centre for Global Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs)
PubMed ID: 18301772
Web of Science ID: 260586500040
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/8143

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