Characteristics associated with reported CAM use in patients attending six GP practices in the Tayside and Grampian regions of Scotland: a survey.


Featherstone, C; Godden, D; Selvaraj, S; Emslie, M; Took-Zozaya, M; (2003) Characteristics associated with reported CAM use in patients attending six GP practices in the Tayside and Grampian regions of Scotland: a survey. Complementary therapies in medicine, 11 (3). pp. 168-76. ISSN 0965-2299 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0965-2299(03)00067-0

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To study the nature of CAM use in primary care attenders, the involvement of their NHS healthcare professionals in their CAM care and differences in characteristics between CAM users and non-users. DESIGN: Postal questionnaire for primary care attenders and analysis of practice leaflets. SETTING: Six Scottish GP practices with a range of practice size, CAM provision within practice, deprivation and rurality. RESULTS: Five hundred and fourteen primary care attenders described 1194 incidences of CAM use and gave details about their main therapy. 37% had contact with a practitioner, the rest mainly self-prescribed. The perceived effectiveness of CAM was high. Patients used CAM for a variety of health problems, mainly as an adjuvant to orthodox medicine rather than an alternative. The involvement of the NHS in CAM delivery was small but there is a significant role to ensure patient safety, especially regarding herb-drug interactions. Disclosure rate of CAM use was low. CAM offered options in areas where the provision in the NHS is difficult, including musculo-skeletal and mental health problems. Provision of CAM by the GP is associated with higher CAM use in primary care attenders. CONCLUSIONS: It is recommended that healthcare professionals include patients' use of CAM in history taking and clinical decision making.

Item Type: Article
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
PubMed ID: 14659381
Web of Science ID: 186814600008
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/7726

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