Who develops severe malaria? Impact of access to healthcare, socio-economic and environmental factors on children in Yemen: a case-control study


Al-Taiar, A; Jaffar, S; Assabri, A; Al-Habori, M; Azazy, A; Al-Gabri, A; Al-Ganadi, M; Attal, B; Whitty, CJM; (2008) Who develops severe malaria? Impact of access to healthcare, socio-economic and environmental factors on children in Yemen: a case-control study. Tropical medicine & international health, 13 (6). pp. 762-770. ISSN 1360-2276 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3156.2008.02066.x

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate the impact of socio-economic and environmental factors on developing severe malaria in comparison with mild malaria in Yemen. METHOD Case-control study comparing 343 children aged 6 months to 10 years diagnosed with WHO-defined severe malaria (cases) at the main children's hospital in Taiz and 445 children with mild malaria (controls) diagnosed in the health centres, which serve the areas where the cases came from. RESULTS In univariate analysis, age < 1 year, distance from health centre, delay to treatment and driving time to health centre were associated with progression from mild to severe malaria. In multivariate analysis, distance to nearest health centre > 2 km was significantly associated with progression to severe disease. Environmental and vector control factors associated with protection from acquiring malaria (such as sleeping under bednets) were not associated with protection from moving from mild to severe disease. CONCLUSIONS Innovative ways to improve access to antimalarial treatment for those living more then 2 km away from health centres such as home management of malaria, especially for infants and young children, should be explored in malaria-endemic areas of Yemen.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Yemen, malaria, severe, children, access, ENTOMOLOGICAL RISK-FACTORS, ANTIMALARIAL-DRUGS, CLINICAL MALARIA, AREA, EPIDEMIOLOGY, TRANSMISSION, MORBIDITY, AFRICA, KENYA
Faculty and Department: Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health > Dept of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases > Dept of Clinical Research
Research Centre: Tropical Epidemiology Group
Malaria Centre
PubMed ID: 18410250
Web of Science ID: 255836600003
URI: http://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/7579

Statistics


Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
347Hits
Accesses by country - last 12 months
Accesses by referrer - last 12 months
Impact and interest
Additional statistics for this record are available via IRStats2

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item